Thursday, 29 July 2010

NCB Class 14 gets the ‘Treatment’

I thought the Class 14 looked nice before, but it's looking much more purposeful now that it's been mucked-up and given a detailed cab interior.

As mentioned in my post from last week, all layout building projects have been put on hold for the time being, including the extension to my colliery-themed model. However, there has been something of a surge in ‘extra-curricular’ activity, so to speak.

Fresh off the weathering production line is a Hattons/Heljan Class 14, a pair of Guy Tippers and a handsome little Thames van, all resplendent in National Coal Board livery. Although there are a few tweaks still to be made here and there, it does feel like I’m making progress with Maudetown. Each model is straight from the airbrush, in terms of the weathering, and shows how nice and dusty a light spraying of enamels can look; perfect for items in a colliery scene.



This Ford E83W Thames van is from the Pocketbond Classix range. For just a couple of quid, it makes a splendid model, especially with a little weathering.


The weathering effects will be heightened further by hand, with Tensocrom acrylic paints, Tamiya pigments and a little dry-brushing. The Class 14 in particular needs a few streaks of leaking fuel and oil, plus the odd scratch and rust patch while the pair of tippers need loading with coal or slag and similar weathering ‘extras’. However, these models are now back in the 'in progress' drawer, awaiting a spare couple of hours to finish the job. Then they can go back into their boxes to await the layout extension!



As much of the cab is visible through the windows, it pays to spruce up the interior mouldings and add a driver. I'd have liked to model one of the cab doors open but it's not possible - the metal chassis and motor are in the way.

Look out for a full demo of how I treated the Class 14 to a painted interior, complete with driver, in a forthcoming issue of Model Rail, while the road vehicles may also turn up in another feature that I’m currently assembling. I’m also putting together some plans for a weekend of hands-on demonstration classes, in airbrushing and weathering, that I hope to be teaching in the New Year. More details of these will follow...


The GUY tipplers need quite a bit more work, including drivers, wing mirrors, registration plates, coal or slag loads and some final weathering touches. Note the polished steel effect on the hydraulic rams!

2 comments:

  1. Hi George, Sorry to dig up an old post, but how are you getting on with the Guy Tippers. The reason i ask was that your article inspired me to get a couple of my own (and a Tarmac one), for my first attempts at weathering.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hi Miles,
    THe Guy Tippers are still in the state seen above - waiting for a chance to complete the full project, but other stuff keeps getting in the way!

    Pics of the finished models will appear here as soon as they're done and dusted...
    Cheers,
    George

    ReplyDelete